Crock Pot Marinara Sauce and Meatballs

Photo Credit: The Country Cook

On the hunt for some mouth-watering new crock pot recipes to try? Then you’ll really want to try this one for Crock Pot Marinara Sauce and Meatballs. It’s got everything you could ever want in a crock pot meal – convenience, flavour, and scores of nutritional value. Marinara sauce is an Italian dish whose name translates into “mariner’s sauce” in English. Marinara sauce was first developed in Naples, and although it has myriad combinations, it’s frequently concocted with tomatoes, onions, garlic, oregano, and other savoury herbs. Marina sauce is most often made in association with pasta dishes, especially spaghetti, and it’s fairly different from the traditional Italian tomato and pasta sauces, especially when it comes to its origin. Although the first historical record of marinara sauce appears in a text entitled, “Lo Scalco alla Moderna,” or ‘the modern steward’, by Antonia Latini and published in the late 1600s, there are many legends as to how this sauce first came into existence. Some believe marinara sauce was actually created by Neapolitan mariners on their way home from the Americas during the mid 16th century. These explorers were first introduced to the tomato by the natives of Mexico and then they brought it back to their homeland.

High in vitamin C, tomatoes would have been very beneficent to sailors spending prolonged periods of time at sea, preventing outbreaks of scurvy and other diseases related to vitamin deficiency. Tomatoes’ high acidity would also have naturally preserved any foods made with them, allowing them to last for several days. So the invention of new recipes with tomatoes as key ingredients seems highly likely during this time, including the invention of marinara sauce. Others believe marinara sauce was created by the seamen’s wives after their husbands brought the tomatoes home. Perhaps both stories are true – the mariners invented marinara sauce and their wives refined it? No matter what the truth is, marinara is a delicious contribution to international cuisine, and we are grateful to have it in our repertoire – especially this easy crock pot marinara sauce version.

If the tomatoes in marinara sauce recipes kept Neapolitan mariners from getting scurvy, what can they do for us? Quite a lot, actually. Just one can of crushed tomatoes is only 32 calories and is high in calcium, manganese, magnesium, niacin, and thiamin, and very high in dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin C, potassium, and iron. Not bad, and that’s just one can – this crock pot marinara sauce recipe also calls for tomato paste as well as tomato sauce. Cooking your meals in a crock pot also tends to preserve and enhance nutrients and enzymes, making this Italian tomato sauce even more nutritious. And that’s just the sauce. If you consider the nutritional content of spaghetti, you’ll learn that one cup of cooked spaghetti contains iron and calcium and is very high in selenium as well. This simple crock pot recipe for marinara sauce and meatballs comes from “The Country Cook” website, where you can find lots more crock pot meal ideas, easy sauce recipes, pasta recipes, and healthy dinner recipes to choose from.

Nutrition Facts for: Crock Pot Marinara Sauce and Meatballs from The Country Cook
Ingredients: Ground beef, eggs, bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, garlic cloves, salt, pepper, extra virgin olive oil, canned crushed tomatoes, tomato sauce, tomato paste, fresh basil, fresh parsley, fresh oregano.
* Percentages (%) are based on a 2000 calorie diet * The entire recipe has been calculated for 6 servings.* Per Serving: Calories 465, Calories from Fat 135, Total Fat 15.0g 23%, Saturated Fat 5.2g 26%, Cholesterol 132mg 44%, Sodium 1154mg 48%, Potassium 1281mg 37%, Carbohydrates 46.8g 16%, Dietary Fiber 11.9g 48%, Sugars 27.8g, Protein 39.9g, Vitamin A 78%, Vitamin C 64%, Calcium 32%, Iron 120%

Learn MORE / Get RECIPE at The Country Cook


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